Cornwall

Call put out for people to consider adopting siblings

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 17:11

Cornwall Council is using National Adoption Week (16-22 October) to highlight the need in Cornwall for potential adoptive parents willing to open their homes to sibling groups.

Around 40 children a year are placed in loving homes in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, and those who are siblings wait longer than single children for their adoptive family.

Find out more about adoption in Cornwall

Cornwall Council cabinet member for children and wellbeing, Sally Hawken, urged those considering adoption to consider the importance of keeping brothers and sisters together. 

“Adoption provides vulnerable children with the love and security of family life that they deserve. It is often in the best interests of the children that a sibling group is placed together in an adoptive family, to enable them to maintain a close and positive sibling bond.

“Brothers and sisters who are placed together provide mutual support, continuity of identity and the sense of safety and belonging that is so critically important not only in childhood, but over the course of a lifetime.”

Kerry and Sacha recently adopted two siblings, describing it as a dream come true and rewarding beyond their expectations.

“We are so grateful and happy we adopted siblings. They have a beautiful bond and a love for each other that has greatly helped their transition to us as their forever family.  Although going from none to two children almost overnight was a very intense experience, it has been incredibly rewarding. We are very proud of our two children, each achieving incredible things in their own ways and at different times. We are rapidly running out of space on the fridge 'hall of fame!',” said Kerry.

“We'd urge other potential adopters not to underestimate the influence you can have on older children. Both our children were over the age of two when we adopted them and we have been quietly astounded by the way in which they have taken on board our influences and characteristics, saying the things we say, wanting to wear the same as us, wanting to be just like their adoptive parents, even wanting to play the same sports!

“Although we have missed some of their early milestones, we are fully embracing and celebrating the milestones they have been meeting in our care and it's just as special, if not more special when those milestones happen.”

Julie Goodwin, Cornwall Council’s  Interim Adoption Service Manager, encouraged anyone thinking about adoption to find out more.

“We have adopters from all walks of life and backgrounds,” she said. “We need people who are able to emotionally attune to the needs of a child and provide a loving and stable home, but who also can offer a child understanding and acceptance of their past history.  We offer training around therapeutic parenting and the needs of adopted children to all our prospective adopters as well as having a dedicated post adoption support service – The Family Plus Team.”

Story posted 16 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Council says no to hate crime

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 16:00

People across Cornwall are being urged to take a stand against hate crime by finding out more about the services available from organisations in Cornwall, how people can support victims of hate and how hate can be reported to these organisations.

A series of events across Cornwall will be highlighting the issue during ‘We Say NO To Hate - Hate Crime Awareness Week which runs from14-21 October and aims to raise awareness of hate crime and to highlight the services available to victims of hate incidents.

Cornwall Council cabinet member for Environment and Public Protection Sue James said:  “Hate crimes have a devastating impact on the individuals involved, but also on the wider community.

“Cornwall Council works across all communities and we want Cornwall to be a welcoming place, where equality, freedom, fairness and opportunity are open to all, and a place where we celebrate diversity.

“A hate incident is any kind of behaviour that causes fear, alarm or distress where the victim or anyone else feels that they have been targeted because of their racial heritage, religion or beliefs, disability, gender identity or sexual orientation.

“We are committed to raising awareness of hate crime, making it easier to report hate incidents and providing help and support to victims and anyone else affected.  Hate crime in any form is wrong but if it goes unchallenged, it will continue to happen. That is why it is important that if you experience, see or know about hate crime in your community, you should report it. We all need to say NO to hate.”

The call to action follows the recent arrest of a 63-year-old man from St Austell who was arrested on suspicion of publishing threatening written material intending to stir up religious / sexual orientation hatred.

Cornwall Council is working with Safer Cornwall, with Devon and Cornwall Police, DisAbility Cornwall, Pentreath Ltd and RJ Working to provide information and reassurance to residents in the towns of Liskeard, Bodmin, Truro, Hayle and Penzance following a rise in hate crimes and incidents since the EU referendum result. 

Pop up events across Cornwall

Monday 16 October 2017 - 10am-2pm

‘Drop in, pop up event’ at the Lux Park Centre, Coldstyle Road, Liskeard where partner agencies, Cornwall Council, Devon and Cornwall Police and DisAbility Cornwall will be on hand to offer advice, support and information to residents.

Tuesday 17 October 2017 - 10am-2pm

‘Drop in, pop up event’ at the Dragon Leisure Centre, Lostwithiel Road, Bodmin where partner agencies, Cornwall Council, Devon and Cornwall Police and DisAbility Cornwall will be on hand to offer advice, support and information to residents.

Wednesday 18 October 2017 - 10am-2pm

‘Drop in, pop up event’ at Tesco Truro, Garras Wharf, Truro where partner agencies, Cornwall Council, Devon and Cornwall Police and DisAbility Cornwall will be on hand to offer advice, support and information to residents.

Thursday 19 October 2017 - 9am-1pm

‘Drop in, pop up event’ at Asda Hayle Harbour, 1 South Quay, Hayle where partner agencies, Cornwall Council, Pentreath Ltd and DisAbility Cornwall will be on hand to offer advice, support and information to residents.

Friday 20 October 2017 - 10am-2pm

‘Drop in, pop up event’ at St John’s Hall, Alverton Road, Penzance where partner agencies, Cornwall Council, DisAbility Cornwall, RJ Working and First Light will be on hand to offer advice, support and information to residents.

To report hate crime, please contact the police.

For more information visit: The Safer Cornwall website

Story posted 16 October 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Plymouth man pleads guilty to fly-tipping near Bodmin - again

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 13:29

 

Joseph Buckingham (31) of Woodend Road, Plymouth pleaded guilty at Bodmin Magistrates Court on 12 October 2017 to fly-tipping in a country lane just outside Bodmin in April 2017. 

Mr Buckingham was previously convicted of a similar offence at Bodmin Magistrates Court in October 2016.

For this latest offence, Mr Buckingham was ordered to  undertake 200 hours community service and ordered to pay costs in full totalling £4,332. 

The area where Mr Buckingham fly-tipped the items was known to Cornwall Council Community Protection Officers as a local fly-tipping ‘hot spot’ and was being monitored.  

An Environmental Protection Officer noticed the waste deposit during his day off and stopped to investigate the waste, After a lengthy investigation, Mr Buckingham was identified as being responsible for the incident. Mr Buckingham’s van was seized as part of this investigation.

Mr Buckingham took waste from a household after being approached to remove the waste for a fee.  

Cornwall Council receive around 4,000 reports of fly tipping on public and private land a year. The cost of collecting and disposing of the fly-tipped waste costs tax payers hundreds of thousands of pounds each year.

Lynn Carter from Cornwall Council’s Public Protection service said: “Cornwall Council continues to work hard to tackle issues of fly-tipping. Fly-tipping is not only unsightly but costs the Council thousands of pounds each year to clear up the mess. We will continue to respond, investigate and, where evidence is found, we will take the appropriate enforcement action.  We are pleased that the court’s comments in summing up supported Public Protection in tackling fly tipping and the sentence and awarding of full costs reinforced this message.”

Cornwall Council cabinet member for Environment and Public Protection Sue James said: “This decision sends out a clear message that Cornwall Council will do everything possible to challenge fly-tipping and when taken to court this irresponsible action can prove extremely costly. It is also important that people paying contractors to dispose of waste undertake the necessary checks to ensure that the contractor is permitted to transport the waste and that the contractor provides the customer with waste transfer notes to ensure that their legal duties are complete.”

Please report fly-tipping to the Council giving as much detail as you can on the location. 

Story posted 16 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council scheme lends more than £2 million to bring empty properties back into use

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 13:19

 

A Cornwall Council scheme has loaned more than £2m to property owners to bring over 100 formerly empty homes back into use over the past 4 years.

Cornwall Council cabinet member for homes Andrew Mitchell says: “One of our Cabinet priorities is to help tackle the housing shortage by bringing empty properties back into use. This National Empty Homes Week, we want those people who may own an empty property to know about the help that is on offer from the Council so that we can assist them and ultimately provide a home.”

Cornwall Council’s empty homes team works with owners of long term empty properties to offer a range of advice and assistance, including a loan scheme, and has been focusing on properties which, for a variety of reasons, have been empty for a sometime.

Mike purchased two neighbouring empty properties in Penzance which had been empty for over 2 years with the plan to create a total of 3 residential properties. He completed the work with the help of the Council’s Empty Property Loan scheme.

Mike said: “I contacted the Council’s Empty Homes Team looking for lending support with my small development project. I had purchased an empty flat and a neighbouring neglected grade 2 listed building and used the empty homes loan to part fund the project. The Empty Homes Loan is a superb and innovative idea targeting funds where they are most needed to help owners regenerate dilapidated housing stock.”

The owner of the former Francis Antony print factory near to St Austell town centre secured planning permission to convert the property into 7 self-contained flats. The owner said:  “When seeking finance to convert our former print factory into apartments Cornwall Council’s empty homes loan scheme provided us with the lowest rate of interest and set of charges.  The empty homes team were very helpful and approachable in a down to earth and transparent way and assisted us throughout the process.”

But even with all the help that is on offer to owners of empty properties, there are still some cases where the Council has to be prepared to tackle the issue of long term empty properties with legal action.

An empty property in Looe which had been abandoned for many years and become an eyesore in the local community has now been sold at auction after action by Cornwall Council.

Officers from the Council’s Empty Homes, Council Tax, Property and Legal teams had made many efforts to trace the whereabouts of owner but without success so have now been granted an order by the court to recover substantial unpaid council tax and in the same process change the ownership of the property.

Councillor Andrew Mitchell, Cornwall Council’s Portfolio Holder for Homes said: “This is a good result for both the people of Looe and Cornwall. There is a shortage of housing in Cornwall and this demonstrates that the Council will when all other avenues have been exhausted, take the necessary action to tackle the issue and bring empty properties back into use.  I hope this sends a clear message to all empty property owners that unless there is a good reason to leave a property unoccupied the Council will take action. 

I encourage empty property owners to contact us so that we can assist wherever possible.  There can be many obstacles to overcome in bringing empty properties back into use, particularly when they are in serious disrepair, but we can often provide a tailored package of assistance and advice.”

There's information about empty properties on our website or you can enquire about the assistance on offer  by contacting the Empty Homes Team:

Tel: 01726 223600
Email: emptyhomes@cornwall.gov.uk

Story posted 16 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Residents and businesses asked for views on Air Quality Management Area for Launceston

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 10:35

Cornwall Council is asking people in Launceston for their views on declaring the town an Air Quality Management Area.  This is an important first step in improving air quality as it ensures there is an action plan for the town and opens up funding opportunities for measures that could help to improve local air quality. 

Councils are required to monitor air quality in their area against national targets and to declare areas with poor air quality as Air Quality Management Areas.  Cornwall Council has been keeping an eye on Launceston’s levels of nitrogen dioxide, which comes from car and lorry exhaust, since 2016.  This long term monitoring has confirmed that the Newport area of the town, particularly St Thomas Road and Newport Square, has excessive levels of traffic related nitrogen dioxide and by law an Air Quality Management Area must now be declared. 

Before the Air Quality Management Area is officially declared residents have an opportunity to get involved by sharing their views on air quality in Launceston, the plans for the Air Quality Management Area, the proposed boundary of the Air Quality Management Area and any measures to improve air quality that they would like to see included in the action plan for the town.

Gemma Massey, Cornwall Councillor for Launceston Central, said: “The consultation gives people the chance to find out more about air quality in Launceston and what the Air Quality Management Area will mean for the town.  I would encourage everyone in Launceston to share their views and ideas about how local air quality could be improved, as your opinions really do matter.”

Sue James, Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Environment and Public Protection, said: “Cornwall Council’s priorities include making Cornwall greener and healthier, and improving air quality is an important part of this.  The declaration of this new Air Quality Management Area will raise drivers’ awareness of harm caused by vehicle emissions and enable the Council to work with the people of Launceston to improve their air quality.  Once the Air Quality Management Area is officially designated, through a legal order, we will start work on an air quality action plan for the town.”

The consultation period runs until 8 December. There will be a public drop in exhibition in Launceston Town Hall from 3pm-7pm on 8 November with staff from Cornwall Council on hand to answer questions and provide information about air quality in Launceston and options for improving it.  Anyone can attend the drop in exhibition or share their views by completing an online survey, emailing the Council on cep@cornwall.gov.uk, posting their comments to the Council or handing them in at Launceston One Stop Shop in Bounsalls Lane.

After the consultation closes, all comments will be considered and the Launceston Air Quality Management Area will be officially designated.  Then work will start on an action plan for Launceston, with local people having a further opportunity to share their ideas for air quality improvement measures at that stage.

There are eight other Air Quality Management Areas in Cornwall, which include Bodmin, Camborne-Pool-Redruth, Camelford, Grampound, Gunnislake, St Austell, Tideford and Truro.

As part of its Clean Air for Cornwall Strategy, Cornwall Council has already introduced a range of projects and policies to help improve air quality across Cornwall.  These include promoting walking and cycling, improving public transport, introducing car clubs, setting emission standards for taxis, minimising emissions from bus and works vehicle fleets, requiring electric vehicle charging points in new build homes, working with employers and schools to develop travel plans, and promoting mixed use development in areas close to public transport and facilities. 

More information and the online survey for Launceston are available on our Launceston air quality page

Story posted 16 October 2017

 

Categories: Cornwall

China Clay Community Network Panel meeting to discuss giving local communities a greater voice

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 10:01

Residents of the China Clay Community Network area are being invited to attend the October meeting of the China Clay Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include plans to give local communities more say on local issues and an update on the St Austell Resilient Regeneration project.

The Network Panel meeting will take place on Monday 23 October 2017 between 7pm and 9pm at Indian Queens Victory Hall, St Francis Road, Indian Queens, TR9 6PW.

There will be a briefing on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through Community Network Panels. The briefing from David Chadwick, Community Link Officer for the network area, will include information on empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues.

Alan Jeffrey, Senior Environment Officer at Cornwall Council, will be giving an update on progress with the St Austell Resilient Regeneration (StARR) flood alleviation and regeneration scheme led by Cornwall Council. The scheme aims to work across the Par and Sandy River catchments to reduce flood risk to communities living and working in the St Austell Bay area, particularly those in Par and St Blazey.

There will be a discussion about the Electoral Boundary Review; an examination of Cornwall Council’s electoral arrangements being conducted by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England. This involves reviewing the total number of members to be elected, the number and boundaries of future electoral divisions and the number of councillors representing each electoral division.

The meeting will include a number of updates including the Cornwall Energy Recovery Centre (CERC) with representatives from Suez coming along.

Parish Councils will be invited to give an update on Neighbourhood Planning from their parishes.

There will also be the latest information on economic development proposals relating to the China Clay area which are being led by the St Austell Bay Economic Forum (SABEF).

At the meeting there will be an opportunity for local residents to ask any questions they may have.

St Enoder Cornwall Councillor Dick Cole and Chair of October’s China Clay Community Network Panel, said: “Everyone is invited to come along to the China Clay Community Network Panel. These panel meetings are a really good opportunity for local residents to find out more about what’s happening in their local community and to have a say. I strongly encourage people to come along and find out more.”

The China Clay Community network panel meets every two months to discuss matters that affect the local area. They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town & parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services. In recent meetings the China Clay Network Panel has focused on the delivery of Cornwall Council services in the area such as housing, planning, transport and highway issues, developing the local economy, the environment, conservation and community safety.

The China Clay Community Network Panel includes all six Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the five Parish Councils (Roche, St Dennis, St Enoder, St Stephen-in-Brannel and Treverbyn) in the community network area.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage.

Posted 16 October  2017

Categories: Cornwall

Cornish Cheese company fined for food safety offences

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:57

Food hygiene concerns with a cheese manufacturing business in Cornwall has led to the owners being fined a total of £6,370.

Following the hearing at Bodmin Magistrates Court on Thursday 5 October, Philip Stansfield, Managing Director of the Cornish Cheese Company based in Upton Cross, Liskeard, was ordered to pay a fine of £2,700, Council costs of £3,500 and a victim surcharge of £170 after pleading guilty to three food hygiene offences.

The Court heard that officers from Cornwall Council’s Public Protection team had, following routine food sampling, identified cheese containing Listeria Monocytogenes produced at The Cornish Cheese Company.  Following this discovery and despite being told that the affected batches could not be sold, the company placed 60 kilograms of contaminated cheese on the market.

The court heard that the business had, between February 2016 and July 2016, failed to satisfactorily address and manage Listeria Monocytogenes issues at their premises which ultimately led to unfit food being put on sale. The business pleaded guilty to three offences and received a one third reduction in their fine as a result.

Tony Pepperell, Senior Environmental Health Officer for Cornwall Council, said: “When a member of the public purchases a particular product from a retailer, they have a right to expect that this meets hygiene standards. Our inspectors play a key role in working with food manufacturers to make sure they meet these standards.”

Sue James, Cornwall Council cabinet member for Environment and Public Protection, said:  “Council officers work with thousands of businesses across Cornwall to check compliance with legal requirements. While the majority of Cornwall businesses do comply, we will not hesitate to prosecute those failing to take timely action to maintain standards to protect public health. Thankfully this is a small number of cases.”

 

Story posted 13 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Celebrations at Tate St Ives

Cornwall Council - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 15:34

Cornwall Council today Friday 13 October congratulated Tate St Ives on their reopening and unveiling of a fantastic extension which will see visitors benefit from a doubling of the gallery space and spectacular new studios for learning activities which have been created to meet growing demand from schools and families across Cornwall.

The project to extend the gallery finally gives Tate St Ives enough space to accommodate the quarter of a million visitors it welcomes each year and to display a year-round exhibition of works by the St Ives Modernists for the first time.  Tate St Ives has generated over £11m each year for the local economy and this redevelopment will ensure that the gallery remains a ‘must see’ cultural destination.

Cornwall Council created Tate St Ives in 1993 and has supported the project to extend and refurbish the gallery from the beginning, providing £4.5m of capital funding towards acquiring the land for the extension, designing and delivering this stunning new gallery. Funding has also been provided by the Arts Council England, Heritage Lottery Fund and Coastal Communities Fund as well as many private trusts, foundations and individuals.

Councillor Paynter, Council Leader, said: “Cornwall Council understands what Tate St Ives and the wider cultural sector has to offer the people of Cornwall and the world – it celebrates the unique artistic history of the county, and continues to champion the importance of creativity in our lives and in our future.

“The Tate delivers value not only to our own communities, but also in terms of our national and international profile. By investing in Tate St Ives we are supporting culture but are also generating almost 200 jobs in the wider local economy as a result of increased visitor numbers over the coming decade.”

Councillor Robinson, Cornwall Councillor for St Ives East, said: “Cornwall Council have supported culture and creativity in Cornwall by investing in this amazing new exhibition space and the refurbishment of the original building.  This project has created fantastic new facilities for education and will enable Tate St Ives to show permanently works from their St Ives Modernist collections.”

The new exhibition space will be launched with shows by Rebecca Warren and a Modern Art and St Ives display. Entry is free for members. More information about Tate St Ives can be found on the Tate website.

Story posted 13 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council and The Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) to offer a joint customer Hub in Helston Library

Cornwall Council - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 09:38

Residents in Helston will soon be able to access a range of public services in one place following the co-location of a Library and Information Service and the Job Centre Plus, including a new children’s library and a JobCentre Plus service.

Redevelopment of the Helston Library building will make more efficient use of the existing building footprint, increasing floorspace by 10%. This means the architects have been able to create a new children’s library, a new interview room and space for the Department of Work and Pension’s Jobcentre Plus service. In addition the Cornwall Council Information Services, which is currently provided at Isaac House, will also be included within the library building.

Bringing other services in to the current Cornwall Council owned building helps reduce costs, increases use of the building and brings in more potential library users, ensuring long-term sustainability.

Co-locating these services not only improves the range of services on offer for people to access in one place, it means the library has been protected.  While other authorities are closing libraries, the move means the library can be protected and remain open.

In addition to the current library service opening hours residents will also benefit from new self-service access from 9am to 5pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays providing extended customer access to the library services in Helston. Customers will be able to use the library, borrow and return items using the self-service kiosks and use the public access computers on these two additional days each week. 

Adam Birchall, Cornwall Council Head of Property, said: “Offering all of these services from a single location will improve the level of customer access and the customer experience.  Reconfiguration means we’ve been able to make much more effective use of public space and the existing building, which is a key part of our work to maximise the way we use public building across Cornwall, as well as ensuring Council delivers value for money.”

Edwina Hannaford, Cornwall Council Portfolio Holder for Neighbourhoods, said: “I would like to thank the Department of Work and Pensions for working with us on this exciting project. The new joint customer Hub will allow local residents, library users and job seekers to access a wide range of essential public sector services at one convenient location and I am sure this will be a great asset for the town.”

John Martin, Cornwall Councillor for Helston South said: “This new customer hub will be of great benefit to the town and I’m sure the new children’s library will prove to be a popular new addition to the Library.”

Commenting on the relocation of the jobcentre to the Helston Library, Nathan Kendall, Jobcentre Plus Manager for Helston, said: “This is excellent news for jobseekers. The move to the new centre will give access to a wide range of key services under one roof.  Advice on benefits and help for jobseekers will be available in this new customer hub, while giving local taxpayers value for money.”

During the period of the refurbishment works at the library, a temporary library service will operate from Issac House, on Tyacke Road, Helston, over the usual library hours. The temporary service will be provided for a period of approximately 12 weeks during the refurbishment works. 

The refurbishment works have begun and are expected to be completed in November.

More information about the Helston Library and Information Service can be found on the Cornwall Council Libraries webpage.

Story posted 11 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

23 new Council homes for local people in Goonhavern

Cornwall Council - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 09:36

People with a local connection to Goonhavern, Truro will soon be able to bid on new Cornwall Council homes for rent.

The 23 new homes at Marshfield Close will be available for bidding online at Cornwall Homechoice from Thursday 12 October.

Built by Kier and managed by Cornwall Housing, the homes were funded by Cornwall Council as part of its new build programme, which aims to see 1,000 council homes delivered over 4 years across Cornwall.

The 23 new homes provide a mix of accommodation options for single people through to families and include:

  • 4 x one bedroom flats - maximum 2 persons
  • 10 x 2 bedroom houses - maximum 4 persons
  • 6 x 3 bedroom houses - maximum 5 persons
  • 2 x 3 bedroom houses - maximum 6 persons
  • 1 x 4 bedroom house - maximum 7 persons

Cornwall Housing’s Director of Operations Nick Cross recently visited the site to see how the development was coming along. He said: “We are really pleased that these 23 new homes will soon be ready, and ahead of schedule, for the first tenants to move in and call home.

“A lot of work has gone into the design and build, with energy efficiency one of the key considerations to help tackle the issue of fuel poverty.”

Andrew Mitchell, Cornwall Council’s cabinet member for Homes said,“These new homes are another positive example of Cornwall Council and Cornwall Housing working together to build and acquire quality homes for the people of Cornwall.

“There is a high demand for social housing across the Cornwall and I am pleased that these new homes will go some way in providing affordable accommodation for those with a local connection to the area.”

The new street name was chosen from a number of suggestions submitted by the public.

Construction on the new homes commenced in January 2017 and has a completion date for the first week in December 2017. Though it is expected that that the homes will now be ready 2 weeks ahead of schedule. 

 

Story posted 11 October 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Improvements completed at Glasney playing field

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 16:18

A longstanding and locally supported project to improve the Glasney Playing Field and surrounding areas for local residents and users has recently been completed by Cornwall Council, working in partnership with Penryn Town Council and the Glasney Greenspace Regeneration Group.

The project has significantly improved the drainage across the park area, targeting the playing field in particular, to make the surface more useable throughout the year.  Works also included improvements to the main entrance, key footpath links across the park and significant vegetation clearance to create a more attractive river area and welcoming space for the community.  Further plans are in place for additional works which will include repairs to the BMX track, and replacement goal posts.

Councillor Symons, Cornwall Councillor for Penryn East and Mylor, said: “I am very happy that these improvements have been made and believe that the playing field will continue to be an important asset in the local community.”

Councillor James, Cornwall Council Portfolio Holder for Environment and Public Protection said: “I am extremely pleased to see these improvements have been made at Glasney Playing Fields. The works to improve the drainage will allow what is already a very popular local open space to be used more by the local community.”

Pip Carlton-Barnes, Glasney Greenspace Regeneration Group Secretary, said: “We are delighted to see work to improve the playing field and bike track has started and with improvements already visible. Having campaigned for many years to see this area brought back to life as a functional space for the community it is hugely rewarding. We have had a number of really positive comments about the now accessible footpaths, and of course the return of the goalposts will bring delight to many! We are very excited about being able to use the field for activities and events throughout the year, which in the future will include the BMX track once again.”

The project has been funded by Section 106 monies, arising from new developments within the area. 

More information about Cornwall Council’s Play Areas, including scheduled improvements, can be found on the Cornwall Council Play Areas webpage.  

Story posted 9 October 2017.

Categories: Cornwall

Spot planets and star clusters at a free stargazing event celebrating Bodmin Moor International Dark Sky Landscape

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 13:01

There’s an opportunity to spot planets and star clusters at an event celebrating the incredibly dark night sky of Bodmin Moor.  The stargazing event will be led by Caradon Observatory and takes place on Saturday 21 October at Jamaica Inn.

The event is one of a series showcasing the exceptional quality of the night sky over Bodmin Moor, which was designated as an International Dark Sky Landscape in July after a successful bid by Cornwall Council and Caradon Observatory.

The dark sky evening on 21 October will be in two parts. At 7.00pm there will be a dinner – carvery and dessert for £15.00 per person. Please call Jamaica Inn on 01566 86250 to book. This will be followed by a free stargazing session at 8.30pm, which is open to everyone. 

The dinner event will include an introduction to Bodmin Moor’s International Dark Sky Landscape designation and a talk on Neptune and the Cornishman John Couch Adams, who predicted the planet’s existence in the 1800s based on irregularities in the motion of Uranus. John Couch Adams initially worked out the calculations in his head before committing them to paper, where they took up some 20 sheets. There will also be an opportunity to see Neptune and its moon Triton illustrated on the Magic Planet, an interactive globe that depicts the topography of planets.

The free stargazing session will start at 8.30pm with a chance to chat with the astronomers. People should wrap up warm and keep their fingers crossed for clear skies. Outside observing will begin from 9.00pm. There will be an array of telescopes for viewing the night sky, including a 12 inch telescope on loan from First Light Optics in Exeter. At twilight Saturn will be a few degrees above the southwest horizon.  Neptune will be due south at around 10.00pm.  Although much smaller than the major gas giants when viewed through a telescope, it will still be visible as a blue disk. Weather permitting, there should also be a chance to see the Andromeda galaxy, a star cluster or two and the beautiful double star, Albireo, at the head of Cygnus, the swan constellation.

Mike Willmott, Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Association and Caradon Observatory’s Director with Responsibility for Theoretical Astronomy and Education, said: “Everyone is welcome to join us for this opportunity to view the stars and planets from one of the darkest areas of night sky in the country. The main focus of the evening will be on the discovery of Neptune, and the work of Cornishman John Couch Adams. In 1845, he used mathematics to predict the position of a new planet which would explain the observed irregularities in the position of Uranus.

“If it’s a clear night, there’ll be the chance to look through telescopes, or to look at the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest spiral galaxy and the most distant object you can view with the naked eye. If it’s cloudy, you’ll still be able to enjoy talks about the wonders of our universe and to put your questions to the astronomers.”

Sue James, Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Environment and Public Protection, said: “Supported by the Cornwall Local Plan, Bodmin Moor’s International Dark Sky Landscape status helps to protect its exceptionally dark and clear skies from light pollution, providing excellent viewing conditions for amateur stargazers, astronomers and astrophysicists.  One of Cornwall Council’s priorities is to work towards a green and prosperous Cornwall, where we both protect the environment and create jobs. Our support for projects like this is a clear indicator of our commitment.

“Bodmin Moor is the first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty to become an International Dark Sky Landscape, and its dark night sky is just as much of an asset as its beautiful and rugged scenery. Other areas with Dark Sky designations have seen a growing trend in dark sky tourism that we hope will be replicated here, particularly during the darker autumn and winter months.”

To book a place at the dinner event, ring Jamaica Inn on 01566 86250. There’s no need to book in advance for the free stargazing, and people are welcome to drop in from 8.30pm.         

More information about Bodmin Moor’s International Dark Sky Landscape designation is available on our dark sky page.

Story posted 9 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel meeting to discuss giving local communities a greater voice

Cornwall Council - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 09:48

Residents of the St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network area are being invited to attend the October meeting of the St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include plans to give communities more say on local issues and an update on the St Austell Resilient Regeneration project.

The Network Panel meeting will take place on Monday 16 October 2017 between 7pm and 9pm at the Burrows Centre, Lamellyn Road, Par, PL24 2DD

There will be a briefing on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through Community Network Panels. The briefing from Edwina Hannaford, Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods and Tasha Davis, Community Link Officer for the area, will include information on empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues.

Rachael Bice, Head of Environmental Growth and Partnerships at Cornwall Council, will be giving an update on progress with the St Austell Resilient Regeneration (StARR) flood alleviation and regeneration project. The scheme, led by Cornwall Council, aims to work across the Par and Sandy River catchments to reduce flood risk to communities living and working in the St Austell Bay area, particularly the people of Par and St Blazey.

There will also be round the table updates from Cornwall Councillors and Town and Parish Councils on matters of interest across the network, and opportunity to share experiences.

At the meeting there will be an opportunity for local residents to ask any questions they may have.

St Blazey Cornwall Councillor Pauline Giles and Chair of the St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel said: “I really encourage people to come along to the Network Panel meeting. These panel meetings are an important opportunity for local people to find out more about what’s happening in their local community and to have their say. Everyone is welcome to come along and find out more.”

The St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area. They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town & parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel includes all five Cornwall Councillors for the area, representatives of the eight Parish Councils (Boconnoc, Broadoak, Lanlivery, Luxulyan, St Sampson, St Veep, St Winnow and Tywardreath and Par) and three Town Councils (Fowey, Lostwithiel, St Blaise) in the community network area.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage. 

Posted 6 October 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Residents encouraged to take part in survey to rate rubbish and recycling collection and street and beach cleaning

Cornwall Council - Wed, 10/04/2017 - 09:56

Cornwall Council is asking residents to complete a short survey to give their views on their household rubbish and recycling service, and on street and beach cleaning.

The survey, conducted by Biffa on behalf of Cornwall Council, runs until 31 October and can be found on the recycling page of the Council’s website.

The survey asks for views on:

  • Rubbish collections
  • Recycling collections
  • Garden waste collection
  • Beach cleaning
  • Street cleaning

Sue James, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Environment and Public Protection, said: “It takes about 10 minutes to complete the survey. We are keen to hear from as many residents as possible as this is a universal service.  We need to keep up to date with what people think of the services we provide and this is your latest opportunity to have your say.  What you tell us will help us ensure the services we deliver are effective and that we continue to make improvements where needed.”

According to the last customer survey carried out in 2016, 94% of Cornwall residents said they were satisfied with their non-recyclable waste collection, with 97% satisfied with the reliability of the collection. 91% said they were satisfied with their recycling collection service, and of those who used the garden waste collection scheme, 98% were satisfied.

Cornwall’s award-winning beaches also scored well, with 89% saying they were satisfied with the standard of beach cleaning. When asked about street cleaning services in their local town or city centre, 85% said they were satisfied with the service, with the highest reason for dissatisfaction being litter caused by birds and animals attacking bins and bags.

Nigel Carr, Biffa’s Cornwall general manager, added: “It’s always very useful to know how residents feel about their waste and cleansing services. Their opinions help the Council and Biffa to consider and make any necessary improvements.”

Story posted 03 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Falmouth and Penryn Community Awareness Days set to address local concerns

Cornwall Council - Tue, 10/03/2017 - 09:35

Residents in Falmouth and Penryn can soon expect a knock on the door to talk about personal safety, waste collection, noise, anti-social behaviour and fire safety as a way of helping to keep the community informed and to listen to issues and concerns.

From 9-20 October representatives from Cornwall Council’s public protection, community safety and anti-social behaviour teams, together with colleagues from Falmouth Town Council, the Devon and Cornwall Police Neighbourhood team, Falmouth University’s Senior Living Support Officer and members of the Student Union will be out door knocking.

The Community Awareness Days aim to give residents an opportunity to talk about issues of concern, ask questions or find out more about local services.

Past visits have been very well received and provided the agencies involved with first-hand feedback about resident concerns.

Councillor Bastin, Chair of the Falmouth and Penryn Community Network Panel, said: “Community Awareness Days are about local communities having a voice in a friendly and non-intimidating environment. This is about us going to residents to hear what they have to say, not just asking them to come to us. It’s also a great opportunity to talk about community safety issues and to either address problems or allay people’s fears.”

Any residents suffering from neighbour problems including noise, waste or other nuisance issues can report them to the Cornwall Council Community Protection Team throughout the year. The team can be contacted 24 hours a day by calling 0300 1234 212 or emailing communityandenvironmentalprotection@cornwall.gov.uk

Candy Atherton, Cornwall Councillor for Falmouth Smithick says: “I would strongly urge people to use the Cornwall Council number to report noise and anti-social behaviour in your area.  It is vital that the authorities know what is going on so action can be taken.” 

Story posted 02 October 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Bodmin Community Network Panel to discuss place-shaping and a greater voice for local communities

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/02/2017 - 16:47

People living or working in the Bodmin area can hear about place-shaping and plans to give local communities more say on local issues at the Bodmin Community Network Panel meeting on Wednesday 11 October at 7pm at Cornwall Council’s Chy Trevail offices.

Place-shaping is about co-ordinating economic development in an area by looking at everything that is happening in that location.  Approaches are based on local circumstances and vary from place to place.  The presentation to the panel will include an update on the work currently underway in Bodmin, which includes a focus on the town centre and the possibility of developing an identifiable brand for the town.  There will also be an opportunity to explore how place-shaping could work for rural areas in the community network.

Cornwall Councillor Edwina Hannaford, Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods, will brief the panel on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through community network panels. This includes empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues. 

Police and Crime Commissioner Alison Hernandez will also be on hand to update the panel about policing issues.

Lanivet Parish Councillor Jane Dent, Chair of Bodmin Community Network Panel, said: “I encourage everyone with an interest in Bodmin and the surrounding parishes to come to the meeting.  It’s an opportunity to find out about local issues and future plans for the area.  As well as the presentations, there will be updates from the town and parish councils and a chance to ask questions and meet your local councillors.”

Bodmin Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and partners such as the police and health services.  Some of the areas that Bodmin Community Network focuses on include health and wellbeing, local policing, superfast broadband, communication, and planning and infrastructure. 

Bodmin Community Network Panel includes all four Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the seven parishes in the community network: Blisland, Bodmin, Cardinham, Helland, Lanhydrock, Lanivet and Withiel.

The meeting takes place on Wednesday 11 October from 7pm to 9pm in Room 2, Chy Trevail, Beacon Technology Park, Bodmin.  The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Bodmin Community Network page.

Story posted 2 October 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Local priorities and parking enforcement on the agenda for Bude Community Network Panel

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/02/2017 - 13:58

People living in and around the Bude Community Network area can help set the network’s priorities and learn more about parking enforcement at their Community Network Panel meeting on Monday 9 October at 7pm in the Parkhouse Centre.

Zoe Hall, Cornwall Council’s Civil Parking Enforcement Manager, and a representative from Cornwall Council’s Parking Operations team will brief the panel and answer questions on local parking and enforcement matters.

There will also be a workshop session to agree the network’s priorities, with a view to influencing Cornwall-wide strategies, local service delivery and local projects.

In addition, the meeting will include a briefing on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through community network panels. This includes empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues. 

Jessie Hamshar, Cornwall Council’s Service Director for Strategy and Engagement, will also be attending.  Each community network panel now has a member of Cornwall Council’s Leadership Team to give advice and help ensure strong links between the panel and the Council.  As the representative for Bude, Jessie will explain how she will support the panel, including helping to progress local concerns.

Cornwall Councillor Nicky Chopak, Chair of Bude Community Network Panel, said: “This should be quite an interesting meeting with issues like parking enforcement and an update on the plans to transform local health and care services on the agenda.  There’s also an opportunity for local residents to share their views on what the community network’s priorities should be, so come along and join in our workshop session.”

Bude Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners, including town and parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services.  Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, community hospitals, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highways issues. 

Bude Community Network Panel includes all four Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the 11 parishes in the community network: Bude-Stratton, Jacobstow, Kilkhampton, Launcells, Marhamchurch, Morwenstow, North Tamerton, Poundstock, St Gennys, Week St Mary and Whitstone.

The meeting takes place on Monday 9 October from 7pm to 9pm in the Conference Room, Parkhouse Centre, Ergue-Gaberic Way, Bude. The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Bude Community Network page.

Posted on 2 October 2017

 

Categories: Cornwall

Recycling rates across Cornwall revealed

Cornwall Council - Mon, 10/02/2017 - 09:57

As Recycle Week comes to a close, new statistics released by Cornwall Council reveal that residents of Truro, Grampound, Probus and the Roseland area are among the best recyclers in Cornwall.

Households in the area recycle around 30 percent of their rubbish - higher than the Cornwall average of 25 percent.  

The average household in Cornwall throws away 500kg of rubbish every year, but a survey of household waste revealed that around 25% of material put out for collection could have been recycled with the possibility of, for example, old aluminium cans being turned into anything from foil trays to aeroplanes.

A national survey released this week found that just four in 10 are confident they put their recycling in the right bins – down six per cent since the last time the survey was carried out last year.

Councillor Sue James, Cornwall Council's Portfolio Holder for Environment and Public Protection said the survey reinforced many people are confused about what can be recycled, highlighting the need for more public information.

“This week we’ve launched a social media campaign to help residents understand what can be recycled, what happens to their waste, and the impact this has on the environment. For example, lots of people don’t know you can recycle things like shampoo bottles, or that you don’t need to remove labels from jars.

“Across most areas of Cornwall, you can now recycle plastic pots, tubs and trays - things like yogurt pots and bottle tops. This is something which many residents said they wanted. We’re about to rollout collections in the last area - St Just in Penwith.  

“While most of us do our bit to recycle what we can, certain items around the house are somehow missing the recycling container and recycling just a few more items can make a big difference. We know through our surveys of household waste that people can recycle much more - our kerbside collections are available for paper, cardboard, plastic bottles, tin foil, glass bottles, and – for the majority of areas - plastic pots, tubs and trays.”

You can order recycling containers or report a missed collection visit our recycling collections page or call 0300 1234 141

Our recycling facts page will give you information on how your area is doing. 

Story posted 29 September 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Major property projects in Liskeard and Looe on the agenda for Liskeard and Looe Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council - Fri, 09/29/2017 - 13:32

Residents in the Liskeard and Looe area are invited to their local Community Network Panel meeting to find out about major property projects. The meeting is on Monday 9 October from 6.30pm to 8.30pm at Pelynt Village Hall.

Adam Birchall, Cornwall Council’s Head of Property, will tell the panel about some of the exciting work that’s going on in and around the two towns.

There’s also an opportunity for local residents to join in speed dating style updates on policing, environmental growth, and CCTV.  There will be a presenter for each topic who will provide a five minute overview and then answer questions for 15 minutes.

In addition to this, Caroline Court, Cornwall Council’s Service Director for Wellbeing and Public Health, will be attending.  Each community network panel now has a member of Cornwall Council’s Leadership Team to give advice and help ensure strong links between the panel and the Council.  As the representative for Liskeard and Looe, Caroline will explain how she will support the panel, including helping to progress local concerns.

Cornwall Councillor Armand Toms, Chair of Liskeard and Looe Community Network Panel, said: “Everyone is invited to come to the meeting and join in the discussion.  The speed dating style updates are always lively, and the presentation on major property projects promises to be very interesting with a lot happening in both Looe and Liskeard.  There will also be one minute updates from the local Cornwall Councillors so people can catch up on what’s going on in their area.”

Liskeard and Looe Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners, including town and parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services.  Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highways issues. 

Liskeard and Looe Community Network Panel includes all eight Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the 18 parishes in the community network: Deviock, Dobwalls and Trewidland, Duloe, Lanreath, Lanteglos by Fowey, Liskeard, Looe, Menheniot, Morval, Polperro, Pelynt, Quethiock, St Cleer, St Keyne, St Martin-by-Looe, St Neot, St Pinnock and Warleggan.

The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Liskeard and Looe Community Network page.  The meeting is open to the public and everyone is welcome.

Story posted 29 September 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Invitation to hear about local matters at the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council - Fri, 09/29/2017 - 09:46

Residents of the Newquay and St Columb Community Network area are being invited to attend the October meeting of the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include local matters and Local Insight; a community mapping tool which provides information about local communities.

The Network Panel meeting will take place on Thursday 5 October 2017 between 7pm and 9pm in the St Wenn Women’s Institute Hall, St Wenn, PL30 5PS.

Rebecca Cohen, an Information Analyst at Cornwall Council, will be presenting the Local Insight information which includes details about housing, education attainment, health and well-being, and crime in the Newquay and St Columb network area. This information will give the panel a better picture of what their community looks like to help them decide priorities for the network area and shape future panel meetings.

Town and parish councils will be invited to say how their Neighbourhood plan is progressing. Neighbourhood planning involves communities working together with their parish council to say where they think new houses and businesses should go, and what they should look like.

There will be a briefing on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through Community Network Panels. This includes empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues.

In addition Phil Mason, Service Director for Planning and Sustainable Development will be coming along. Each Community Network Panel now has one of the Directors from Cornwall Council’s Leadership Team on the panel. As the representative for Newquay and St Columb, Phil will explain how he’ll support the network panel including helping to progress any local concerns.

At the meeting there will be an opportunity for local residents to ask any questions they may have.

St Mawgan and Colan Cornwall Councillor John Fitter and Chair of the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel said: “Everyone is invited to attend the meeting of the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel. These panel meetings are an important way for local residents to find out more about what’s happening in their local community and to have a say. I strongly encourage people to come along and find out more.”

The Newquay and St Columb Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area. They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town & parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel includes all seven Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the five Towns or Parish parishes in the community network: Colan Parish Council, Mawgan-in-Pydar Parish Council, Newquay Town Council, St Columb Major Town Council and St Wenn Parish Council.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage. 

Posted 29 September 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Pages

Subscribe to thelocalnewspapers.mobi aggregator - Cornwall