Shropshire

Severn Trent Water fined for Shrewsbury road closure

Shropshire Council News Feed - 6 hours 56 min ago

Severn Trent Water Ltd has been ordered to pay more than £8000 after a road closure in Shrewsbury remained in place during peak hours, and outside of the permitted times.

At Telford Magistrates Court on 15 April [2019] Severn Trent pleaded guilty to offences under the New Roads and Street Works Act 1991 and Traffic Management Permit Scheme (England) Regulations 2007.

The offences were in relation to work to install a water main on Ellesmere Road on 18 and 19 September 2018. The works failed to comply with regulations resulting in a road closure remaining in place on a main commuter route into Shrewsbury during peak rush hour traffic.

The road closure was required to be removed by 6am, but remained in place until 9.30am. This caused considerable disruption to commuters and residents and led to a number of complaints.

Severn Trent Water Ltd was fined a total of £4000 for the offences and ordered to pay £4476.76 costs and a £170 victim surcharge.

Steve Davenport, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for highways and parking, said:

“This extended road closure during morning peak traffic hours caused severe disruption and generated a large number of complaints. Shropshire Council is responsible for regulating works taking place on our network of roads and any avoidable breaches that disrupt the flow of traffic and safety of the network are taken extremely seriously, as this prosecution shows.”

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Church Stretton shoppers asked what matters to them about Shropshire Care Closer to Home

Shropshire Council News Feed - Thu, 04/18/2019 - 16:39

News from our partners Shropshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)

Finding out what matters to local people about Shropshire Care Closer to Home is the aim of a pop-up event in Church Stretton run by NHS Shropshire CCG next week (Thursday 25 April 2019).

CCG staff will be at the Mayfair Community Centre on Easthope Road, Church Stretton, from 10.30am to 2pm on Thursday 25 April to tell people about the Shropshire Care Closer to Home Programme.

The Shropshire Care Closer to Home Programme aims to help local people, over 65, with a number of health conditions, get care and support from the NHS and Shropshire Council in their own home or local community and avoid a hospital stay.

Members of the Shropshire Care Closer to Home Programme will be listening to feedback and ideas from residents in Church Stretton about how the programme could work in their community.

They especially want to know what matters to local people over 65 who have day-to-day experience of care and support from the local NHS and Shropshire Council and if there is anything that could be changed or done differently.

To share what matters to you, and to find out more about Shropshire Care Closer to Home, visit the team on:

Date:        Thursday 25 April, 2019

Venue:     Mayfair Community Centre

Address:  Easthope Rd, Church Stretton, SY6 6BL

Time:       10.30am – 2pm

No appointment is necessary. For further information contact the Shropshire Care Closer to Home Team via e-mail: shrccg.careclosertohome@nhs.net

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Experience of Care Week (22-26 April 2019)

Shropshire Council News Feed - Thu, 04/18/2019 - 16:32

News from our partners Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH)

The work of staff who provide care for patients, families and carers will be celebrated next week when the trust that runs Shropshire’s two acute hospitals takes part in Experience of Care Week.

Experience of Care Week 2019

Experience of Care Week is an international initiative, running from 22 April to 26 April 2019, which recognises the value of each health worker’s contribution to a patient’s experience.

Many caring roles are carried out behind the scenes and not witnessed by the patient and their family, but every member of staff contributes to the experience a patient and their loved ones have while being treated at The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH), which runs the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital (RSH) and the Princess Royal Hospital in Telford (PRH).

Ruth Smith, SaTH’s Lead for Patient Experience, said:

“The Trust recognises and appreciates the work done by every employee to provide the very best experience for our patients. Whether on the front line or working behind the scenes, all staff provide a vital role in caring and together we are greater than the sum of our parts.”

SaTH are celebrating Experience of Care Week in a number of ways:

  • A patient experience film has been created to capture and recognise the value of SaTH’s ‘hidden heroes’ who contribute to a patient’s journey.
  • ‘Observe & Act’ is being rolled out across both hospital sites to improve patient experience. The purpose of Observe and Act is to view a patient’s service experience from their perspective and then learn from it, share good practice and where necessary act to make improvements.
  • Staff are being invited to share stories about how they made a positive difference to a patient’s experience.
  • As part of SaTH’s Patient and Carer Experience (PaCE) Panel, a carers’ sub-group has been established to focus on the support available to carers and the experience they have at SaTH.
  • New patient experience webpages have been developed and launched along with a new patient experience portal
  • The Dementia Support Team will be holding a Dementia Café at RSH and a mobile afternoon tea will be held on Ward 10 at PRH on Tuesday 23 April to support Experience of Care Week.

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: How to get four middle-aged men across the Atlantic Ocean in a row boat

Shropshire Council News Feed - Thu, 04/18/2019 - 15:48

News from our partners University Centre Shrewsbury

How should four men in their 50s prepare for one of the world’s most arduous mental and physical endurance races? What happens to their bodies when they undertake such a physical challenge? Are they better or worse off physically when they finish?

These are among the questions that University Centre Shrewsbury’s Centre for Active Living will be addressing as they provide health and training advice to the Atlantic Mavericks, a rowing team of four men in their 50s (two of whom are from Shropshire) who plan to row 3,000 miles across the Atlantic Ocean, from the Canary Islands to Antigua & Barbuda, in 45 days. Known as the world’s toughest row, it is a gruelling race that will take a physical and mental toll on the men.

(from left in dark shirts): The Atlantic Mavericks: Roy Dixon, Richard Baker and Ian Davies. Front centre: Joanna Pike, physiotherapist, Royal Shrewsbury Hospital and John Buckley, Prof Exercise Medicine, University Centre Shrewsbury. Back from left: Sue Taylor, UCS Exercise Lecture; Chris Kite, exercise physiology lecturer UCS; Liz Howard, cardiac scientist, St. George’s Park; Chris Ellis, cardiac scientist, RSH.

John Buckley, Professor of Exercise Medicine at UCS, said:-

“We want to reduce as much as possible the controllable short-term harms of such an event to prevent any lasting harm. Our primary aim is to get them to the start-line with the right amount of strength, endurance and flexibility. During the race, it will then mainly be a battle of psychological will and teamwork.”

To advise and support the Mavericks, Buckley is co-ordinating a team from UCS and the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital (RSH) of exercise scientists, cardiovascular medicine specialists, physiotherapists, nutritionists and psychologists.

The rowers

The Mavericks will work in pairs as they cross the Atlantic, rowing and sleeping in two-hour cycles. They will face the unpredictability of the swells and squalls of the sea, high winds, scorching sun, torrential rain, and an ocean of salt water and sharks. They will eat cold, pre-packaged dehydrated food, and use a bucket as their toilet. Each rower will drink 10 litres of water and burn more than 5,000 calories a day, and face losing up to a stone in weight. Together they will have completed more than 1.5 million oar strokes when they reach the finish line.

Despite claiming that they are “ordinary chaps”, it requires an extraordinary amount of mental toughness to consider such a journey.

Ian Davies, Atlantic Maverick rower, said:-

“Rather than dashing off to buy a sports car, we’ve spent our money on buying a boat that will push us to our limits, in aid of charity, and achieve something quite unthinkable and remarkable. We want to give back and inspire others by showing no matter what your circumstances or age, you can still achieve the seemingly impossible.”

Buckley’s Exercise Medicine Team at UCS, have now evaluated the Mavericks’ hearts, lungs, bones and joints along with aerobic fitness, strength and flexibility. Dr Tom Ingram, cardiologist at RSH, is leading the medical evaluations to check for any underlying health conditions that could affect their preparations. Once the results and their current training programme are assessed, the UCS Exercise team will create a holistic training package of exercise, nutrition and psychological guidance.

One of the biggest psychological challenges with highly driven people like the Mavericks is convincing them to take scheduled physical and mental rests.

John Buckley said:-

“Overtraining can be just as detrimental to performance as does not
enough training. Lack of rest periods during training is the biggest cause of injury and health issues. We want to find the optimal zone where they are physically and mentally prepared and injury free when they arrive at the start-line.”

For the UCS team this work is also a teaching and research opportunity for the postgraduate Exercise Medicine students. Students get frontline experience in assisting in the assessment of the Mavericks’ hearts, muscles and joints and then seeing the effects during training and when they complete the challenge. Current
research has focused on younger athletes, but with more and more people in the population over the age of 60, Buckley notes, it is important for us to better understand the threshold between not enough and too much exercise in this older cohort.

The Mavericks – Roy Dixson, Richard Baker and Ian Davies – are retired servicemen who forged their friendship on the rugby pitch. As part of their challenge, they will be raising both awareness and funds for several worthwhile charities including Myeloma UK and 353. The Talisker Whiskey Atlantic Challenge is the world’s premier ocean rowing event with approximately 30 teams from across the world taking on the unique challenge of crossing the ocean in a row boat this year. They will begin in early December 2019.

UCS’ Centre for Active Living performs research across all elements of physical activity linked with health, including those beyond traditional sport and fitness settings such as workplace design, the built environment and transport. The Centre offers a BSc in Health and Exercise Science that leads to qualifications in personal coaching and training, health and exercise rehabilitation and public health and public health promotion, as well as a MSc in Exercise Medicine that focuses on exercise in health, disease management and prevention.

University Centre Shrewsbury offers 16 undergraduate and nine post-graduate degrees. Now in its fourth year, UCS provides a high quality, personalised education with employability at its core, in one of England’s finest medieval towns.

Photo 1 (from left in dark shirts): The Atlantic Mavericks: Roy Dixon, Richard Baker and Ian Davies. Front centre: Joanna Pike, physiotherapist, Royal Shrewsbury Hospital and John Buckley, Prof Exercise Medicine,
University Centre Shrewsbury.
Back from left: Sue Taylor, UCS Exercise Lecture; Chris Kite, exercise physiology lecturer UCS; Liz Howard,
cardiac scientist, St. George’s Park; Chris Ellis, cardiac scientist, RSH.

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Museum in Australia would like you to check your attic for HMS Beagle images

Shropshire Council News Feed - Thu, 04/18/2019 - 15:28

News from our partners University Centre Shrewsbury

The Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (MAGNT), the premier cultural organisation in Australia’s Northern Territory, is asking Shropshire people for help. The Museum hopes that someone in Shropshire, the birthplace of Charles Darwin, will have a depiction of the HMS Beagle’s anchors.

Darwin spent five years travelling around the world on the HMS Beagle – an education that led to one of science’s highest achievements, The Origin of Species.

This past October (2108), a team of Australian explorers found one of the HMS Beagle’s two anchors in a rocky hollow beneath 10 metres of murky brown water at the bottom of the mighty Victoria River in the north of Australia. Once recovered, the anchor will become a prized artefact on display in Darwin as one of the only relics remaining of one of the best-known vessels in maritime history.

Professor Tim Jenkins, Head of Arts & Humanities, University Centre Shrewsbury, said:-

“The Beagle is the little ship that could – a smaller workhorse vessel manned by some the best sailors of the day. Not only was she instrumental in one of science’s greatest breakthroughs, but also the surveying of large sections of unchartered Australian coast.”

In their research, the curators have been able to find only one image of the Beagle that shows the anchors – a drawing from one of Darwin’s books that is under license. They hope there is another in existence that could be shared with them.

Two previous expeditions had tried and failed to find the anchors.

Ben Wall, skipper of the successful team, said:-

“It’s a savage river. In addition to crocodiles, bull sharks and deadly jellyfish, the crew had to face a 60-knot squall. You can only imagine what the blokes on the Beagle went through. They would’ve had a bloody hard time.”

The anchors were lost on the Beagle’s third and final journey (1837-1843), when Darwin’s former shipmates John Wickham and John Lort Stokes were surveying the coast of Australia. During the trip, the seamen gave many Australian places on the coast English names, such as the (Queen) Victoria River and Port Darwin (which later lent its name to the city of Darwin), whose fine-grained sandstone reminded them of their friend and his “geologising.”

The Beagle crew set out to survey the length of the dangerous Vic but after miserable conditions – freak storms, whirlpools, those pecky crocodiles, mosquitoes, dysentery – they decided to return to the relative calm of the ocean. When they tried to make the turn, the ship’s anchors were stuck on the river bottom.

The crew feverishly tried to raise the precious anchors – nearly splitting the boat in half in the process – to no avail. Noting the loss in his diary, Lort Stokes wrote: “circumstances suggest the appropriate name of Holdfast Reach for this locality.”

“Perhaps in some future generations, when this part of the world has undergone the changes that seem destined for it,” he further wrote, “the archaeologist of the Victoria River may in vain puzzle his wits with speculation concerning the Beagle’s anchors.”

Paul Clark, Senior Curator, Maritime Archaeology and History, MAGNT, said:-

“Not only was Lort Stoke a superb seaman, but prescient as well. Here we are, 180 years after the loss of the Beagle’s anchors, in search of more information about them.”

Paul Kirkbright, Deputy Provost of the University Centre of Shrewsbury, met Clark when he recently visited Darwin and the Northern Territories on invite from the University of Darwin:-

“The museum asked if the University could help them try to find more documentation on the anchors by asking Shropshire people to check their attics for images that may be of use. You never know what might turn up.”

In 1845, after its third journey, the HMS Beagle was retired as a coastguard watch vessel in the River Roach where it was moored until sold as scrap in 1870 to a local farmer.

Remaining timbers from the lower hull were discovered near the mooring place, as well as three of the four Beagle’s last set of anchors.

Should you have documentation of the HMS Beagle’s anchors, please contact us at:
communications@ucshrewsbury.co.uk.

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Categories: Shropshire

Improve your HR processes with Shropshire HR

Shropshire Council News Feed - Thu, 04/18/2019 - 14:00

Shropshire HR are holding on one-day course designed to give businesses the knowledge and confidence to audit their own HR policies, processes and procedures.

Shropshire HR

The one-day course will take place on Friday 17 May 2019 from 9.30am–4pm in the Haydn Smith Room at Theatre Severn in Shrewsbury.

HR processes cover everything from recruitment to retirement, and often in a small business it can be frustrating when there is not a dedicated team to deal with HR issues.

‘HR for Beginners’ aims to gives delegates an overview of the HR policies, processes and procedures they need to have in place to fulfil statutory and legislative requirements.

This practical and effective one-day course  covers topics like:

  • The contract of employment
  • Absence management
  • Disciplinary and capability procedures

Spaces cost £80 per person and lunch is provided.

Darren Edwards, Shropshire HR business partner for development, said:

“Shropshire HR’s ethos is about supporting and enabling organisations across Shropshire. Our ‘HR for Beginners’ training course seeks to do this by upskilling and improving the knowledge of individuals with responsibility for staffing matters – particularly from SMEs and charities.

“Over the course of the past 12 months we have been able to put on a variety of training courses across the county, all of which have helped enable organisations to handle staffing and employment matters with confidence.”

Spaces for ‘HR for Beginners’ are limited. To book a space on this course, contact Darren Edwards by emailing darren.edwards@shropshire.gov.uk
or by calling 07458 120561.

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Hospital team develops newspaper to help cancer patients

Shropshire Council News Feed - Wed, 04/17/2019 - 13:18

News from our partners Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH)

A team at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital has developed its own newspaper to help cancer patients understand more about their treatment.

The Radiotherapy Team based at the Lingen Davies Centre has produced Radiotherapy News, a monthly newsletter which provides information about what’s happening in the department, developments in Radiotherapy both at The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust and nationwide and more about a patient’s treatment.

Newspaper for cancer patients

Bernadette Mortiboy, Technical Superintendent with the Radiotherapy Department, said:

“The team in Radiotherapy are aware that at the beginning of a patient’s journey through the department they are bombarded with lots of information. There is a lot to take in at a time when they are very vulnerable and can feel overwhelmed.

“When their course of treatment starts, they can face a long time in our waiting room before they can be treated.

“That’s why we came up with the idea of writing a regular newspaper with information about treatment, the team, and radiotherapy news from around the world.”

The first issue was launched at the end of March and was made available in the patient’s waiting room.

Newspaper for cancer patients

William Fearson, a patient who is being seen by the Radiotherapy team, said he was impressed by the initiative.

He said:

“I think it’s absolutely excellent – easy to read, informative and well-illustrated. It also reflects the kindness and professionalism of the staff. As a patient it’s all really appreciated.”

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Categories: Shropshire

Success of new giftware shop is a dream come true for Meg Hawkins

Shropshire Council News Feed - Wed, 04/17/2019 - 12:01

Meg Hawkins’ popular new giftware shop in the Pride Hill Shopping Centre

A new independent giftware store that opened in Shrewsbury’s Pride Hill Shopping Centre last November is proving hugely popular and attracting a wide range of customers, from students to home owners to business people.

Meg Hawkins is a licensed, published watercolour artist whose work features on greetings cards, prints, gifts and homeware.

In November Meg opened her new giftware shop on the middle-level of the Centre, seeing it as a huge opportunity for her popular and ever growing brand to reach new customers –  and a chance to bring a dream to fruition.

Meg at the opening of her new shop in November 2018

Nearly six months on Meg is delighted with how popular her new venture is proving to be, as she explains.

What inspired you to open in Shrewsbury?

Meg: Shrewsbury is such a vibrant and wonderful town and being given the opportunity to open our first shop here has been fantastic. It has been brilliant having a base here in this town from which to operate the business, sell our products and meet our customers both old and new.

Who visits your shop in Pride Hill? 

Meg: We have been amazed by how many new customers have visited us in the shop – everyone from students to empty nesters, from those looking to decorate homes or businesses to people looking for bespoke designs. It is very exciting to know that my work has such a wide appeal.

People love your shop – why do you think it’s so popular?

Meg: I hope it’s because people can see the love and passion we have for it and would like to think that our enthusiasm is infectious.

What is unique about your shop?

Meg: My husband Ade and I have fitted the whole shop out by hand and are very proud with how it looks and feels. I am constantly creating new work and developing new products as well, so that there is always something new for people to see when they visit the shop. We are so passionate about what we do and put a lot of love into the shop – there is nowhere else like it as a result. We really wanted to give the homely feel for our customers to enjoy a relaxed atmosphere to enjoy browsing and shopping. With soft lighting can really create a wonderful shopping experience

What makes the location so special? 

Meg: We are in a beautiful, historic town, which takes great pride in its independent shops. We have also been supported from the beginning by Shropshire Council and by the shopping centres, ensuring that we can really thrive in this stunning town.

Do you have any favourite products?

Meg: Can I say all of them?! We have been working with a number of licensing companies over the past two years and this has enabled us to bring several products to market to sit alongside the cards, prints and gift wrap. These products range from standing fine bone china to fair trade bowls, which I love.

Meg at work

Any exciting news to share? 

Meg: We now stock nearly 100 stockists nationally and internationally with our cards and prints, which is amazing. I am also really excited about the new product development we are currently working on with the licensing companies we are contracted to. You will be able to see the new products in the shop soon! We also recently won Best New Business in the Midlands in the Rural Business Awards, which was an incredible honour.

What’s the hardest thing about running a small retail shop? 

Meg: The hardest thing is being a ‘one-man-band’. I have an incredible team of friends and supporters but really want to get to the point where I can employ staff to help the business grow further and give me more time to create new designs and develop new products.

How do you feel about the news of High Streets suffering?

Meg: I feel that people do still want to go out and shop but they want an experience – they want to touch, feel and engage. I think the Shrewsbury BID, Shropshire Council and the shopping centres are working incredibly hard to innovate and drive footfall so I am in the best place to grown my own bricks and mortar retail business.

For more information about Meg, her shop and her work, go to: www.meghawkins.co.uk.

Issued on behalf of Shrewsbury Shopping Centres

 

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Categories: Shropshire

Decisions made by Central planning committee on 11 April 2019

Shropshire Council News Feed - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 15:39

The following decisions were made by Shropshire Council’s Central planning committee at its meeting at Shirehall, Shrewsbury on Thursday 11 April 2019.

Residential development north of Leigh Road, Minsterley, Shrewsbury (18/05802/OUT) Outline application (access off Leigh Road for consideration) for residential development (up to 28 dwellings) to include some demolition.

Decision

That planning permission be granted as per the officer’s recommendation subject to:

  • A Section 106 legal agreement to secure an affordable housing contribution;
  • The conditions set out in Appendix 1;
  • The amendment of Condition 2 to reduce the length of time for an application for reserved matters from three years to one year; and
  • An additional condition to ensure that SC Drainage Team be consulted in relation to the submitted drainage scheme.

Meeting room, 17 Betton Street, Shrewsbury (18/04386/FUL) Mixed residential development of seven dwellings following demolition of all buildings on site; alterations to existing vehicular access; formation of driveway and parking areas.

Decision

That planning permission be refused contrary to the officer’s recommendation for the following reason:

  • The proposal would constitute overdevelopment of the site which, due to its scale, layout and design, would result in a development which would neither preserve nor enhance the character or appearance of the Belle Vue Conservation Area.  The proposal would therefore be contrary to national and Development Plan policies including CS6 and CS17 of the Shropshire Core Strategy, MD2 and MD13 of the SAMDev Plan, and Section 16 of the NPPF.

41 Wood Street, Shrewsbury (18/05584/FUL) Change of use from A1 retail to A5 hot food takeaway restaurant and associated alterations to the building.

Decision

That planning permission be refused contrary to the officer’s recommendation for the following reason:

  • Members considered that the proposed change of use provided in-sufficient off-street parking spaces for both staff and customers.  It was acknowledged that the fall-back position was the use of the commercial premises as an A1 retail unit (including use as an off-licence) and that all customers travelling by vehicle would be required to find a space to park in the surrounding streets.  However, it was considered that the pattern of use and demand for on-street parking would be significantly different and increased for the proposed A5 use. This increased demand for parking would be generated at times when there was likely to be minimal parking available in the surrounding streets and as such would encourage inappropriate parking or waiting of vehicles and have a detrimental impact on the local highway network contrary to Shropshire Councils adopted policies CS6 and MD2.

School House Farm, Sheinton, Shrewsbury (18/04266/FUL) Change of use of farm yard and buildings to holiday complex to include: some demolition of buildings; siting of four glamping units and one log cabin; works to and change of use of two buildings to form office and store and leisure facilities, formation of parking areas; and installation of package treatment plant (Amended Description).

Decision

That consideration of the application be deferred to a future meeting of this committee to allow the opportunity for the concerns raised by Members in relation to the use of the site all year round and the lack of on-site supervision to be addressed.

Proposed development land off Mount Close, Pontesbury, Shrewsbury (18/05670/FUL) Erection of 18No. affordable dwellings and associated works.

Decision

That authority to grant planning permission be delegated to the Head of Planning Services subject to:

  • The conditions recommended in appendix 1 and any modifications to these conditions deemed necessary;
  • The signing of a Section 106 agreement to secure the affordable housing in perpetuity; and
  • An amendment to Condition 8 to require that the Construction Management Plan provides for any intention to use netting on trees and hedges to prevent birds from nesting to be agreed by the Ecology Team.

25 Abingdon Road, Shrewsbury (19/00595/FUL) Erection of 18No. affordable dwellings and associated works.

Decision

That planning permission be granted as per the officer’s recommendation subject to the conditions set out in Appendix 1.

Hillside, Rowley, Shrewsbury (19/00758/FUL) Erection of 2 storey extension to rear of building; detached 3-bay part open fronted garage block.

Decision

Withdrawn from the agenda for Central planning committee – for determination by the South planning committee.

 

For further information relating to the decisions go to our online planning register and search for the application by using the reference number or keyword.

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Categories: Shropshire

An Anglo-Saxon Treasure from Shropshire

Shropshire Council News Feed - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 15:15

Mr John Ellery, HM Senior Coroner for Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin, held a treasure inquest this morning (16/4/19) into a recently discovered archaeological find.

The find had been reported via The British Museum’s Portable Antiquities Scheme as a result of responsible metal detecting within the county.

The find is a silver early medieval / Saxon pyramidal sword mount discovered in the Culmington area of south Shropshire.

At inquest Mr Ellery found that the find was more than 300 years old when discovered and formed of precious metal (silver) with a content of more than 10%. With this in mind he declared the case Treasure under the 1996 Act.

This silver early medieval / Saxon pyramidal sword mount is over 300 years old

The find was initially reported to the finds liaison officer for Lancashire and Cumbria, Lydia Prosser. In her specialist report prepared for the coroner, Ms Prosser states that:

The mount is complete being a four-sided pyramid with a flat, square top. Each face is decorated with an inverted U-shape motif, the terminals of which curl back upon themselves.

“The motif is in shallow relief and set within a recessed panel. The mount is hollow with a square base. An integral bar runs centrally across the underside of the mount and this is how the mount would have been affixed to a scabbard. Traces of gilding are retained in the recessed areas; otherwise, the mount is dark-grey in colour. In size it is around 14mm square and rises to a height of 9mm. It weighs 2.65 grams.”

Dr Sue Brunning, Curator, European Early Medieval Collections at the British Museums, said:

“Pyramidal mounts are well known in Anglo-Saxon and Continental archaeological contexts. Their function is still uncertain, but it seems likely that they were used to help secure the sword in the scabbard, by means of a strap running through the transverse bar on the base.

“Two were famously found in the high-status graves of Sutton Hoo Mound 1, but they are relatively uncommon grave finds. They are, however, familiar as stray finds with ever-increasing numbers recorded on the Portable Antiquities Scheme database. Close parallels decorated with the inverted U-shaped motif are recorded from West Lindsey, Lincolnshire, Drax, North Yorkshire, topped with a garnet; and Newbold Pacey, Warwickshire.”

Peter Reavill, Finds Liaison Officer for Shropshire and Herefordshire, said:

“The discovery of this small but important Anglo-Saxon treasure is immensely important for the County of Shropshire.

 

“Since the discovery of the Dinham Pommel more than 20 years ago, which is housed in Ludlow Museum, objects related to swords are exceptionally rare. The archaeology of the Corve Dale is extraordinarily rich, but we have very few finds which show this in the post Roman period.”

Shropshire Museums’ Service and Ludlow Museum are interested in acquiring the mount for display locally.

Lezley Picton, Shropshire Council Cabinet member for culture and leisure, said:

“This find further demonstrates the rich history of Shropshire and the stories we have to share and I’m excited to see what else has yet to be discovered.

 

“Shropshire Museums are interested in acquiring the Saxon pyramidal sword mount to be displayed alongside its’ already wonderful collection.”

Now that this case has been officially declared treasure – the next stage is for them to be independently assessed by a panel known as the Treasure Valuation Committee. They will find the market value of artefact and the museum will be given the option to acquire it. The monies raised will be shared jointly as a reward between the finder and landowner.

If you are interested in exploring Shropshire’s rich history then you can support the friends of Shrewsbury and / or Ludlow Museum (with hyperlinks to their websites)

If you use or are thinking of becoming a metal detectorist yourself, follow this link to learn how to do so responsibly.

Further Information

More information and images on the cases can be found here:

Sword Mount:   https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/926621

Image: https://finds.org.uk/database/images/image/id/1053628/recordtype/artefacts

Images maybe reproduced and used with permission of British Museum’s Portable Antiquities Scheme.

More information about PAS and Treasure can be found here.

Ludlow Museum has a number of important treasures on permanent display including:

The Dinham Pommel
The South Shropshire Ring
Bitterley Hoard

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Categories: Shropshire

Primary school admission figures for 2019 announced

Shropshire Council News Feed - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 09:22

Families in Shropshire are today (Tuesday 16 April 2019) finding out whether their children have been offered a reception place at their preferred primary schools this September.

The figures for the Shropshire Council area for 2019 are:

Total number of applications: 2758
Number allocated their 1st preference: 2598 (94.2%)
Number allocated their 2nd preference: 88 (3.2%)
Number allocated their 3rd preference: 20 (0.7%)
Number allocated one of their preferred schools: 2706 (98.1%)
Number allocated an alternative school: 52 (1.9%)

For comparison, the figures for 2018 were:

Total number of applications: 2722
Number allocated their 1st preference: 2596 (95.4%)
Number allocated their 2nd preference: 81 (3.0%)
Number allocated their 3rd preference: 9 (0.3%)
Number allocated one of their preferred schools: 2686 (98.7%)
Number allocated an alternative school: 36 (1.3%)

Karen Bradshaw, Shropshire Council’s director of children’s services, said:

“We are really pleased that such a high percentage of pupils will be going to their first preference of primary school in 2019. Although there is pressure for primary school places across the country, this has not been experienced to the same degree in Shropshire, where there are only a few pressure points.

“We work hard to ensure that as many children as possible are able to attend their preferred school. Although it is not possible in every case, more than 98% of applicants will attend one of their top three preferred schools and all applicants have been offered a place.”

 

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Categories: Shropshire

Excitement at Acton Scott Historic Working Farm as new shire horses arrive

Shropshire Council News Feed - Tue, 04/16/2019 - 07:30

Acton Scott Historic Working Farm have acquired a pair of working shire horses following a hugely successful crowdfunding campaign and the kind support of the community and donators.

William and Alfie recently arrived at Acton Scott Historic Working Farm

Acton Scott Historic Working Farm launched a crowdfunding campaign in February 2019 to replace their iconic working shire horses, Charlie and Joe, who are fast approaching retirement.

The new boys, William and Alfie, arrived at Acton Scott just over a week ago and have been gradually getting acclimatised to life on the working farm, meeting Charlie and Joe who are soon set for retirement as well as Dusty the donkey and Delilah the mule.

William and Alfie are 10 and 11 years old and have always lived and worked together, mainly pulling carts though they do have experience of working on the land as well.

The resident wagoner/equine manager at Acton Scott has been training William and Alfie since their arrival to make them fit and safe for life on a Victorian working farm. There is a long road ahead of them getting used to each different machine and building up their muscle power before they can completely take over the heavy work on the farm.

William & Alfie with wagoner and equine manager, Simon Trueman

Lezley Picton, Shropshire Council Cabinet member for culture and leisure, said:

“I’m thrilled that Acton Scott Historic Working Farm have been able to acquire a working pair of shire horses, and I’m really looking forward to meeting them.

 

“I’m acutely aware that this would not have been possible without the amazing support and generosity of the Shropshire community and visitors to our wonderful county and I’m extremely grateful. Thank you!”

Sarah Green, facilities manager at Acton Scott Historic Working Farm, said:

“All the team here at the farm are overwhelmed by the generosity of the people of Shropshire and further afield and we are incredibly grateful.

 

“Their support will enable us to look after Charlie in his ‘phased retirement’ and keep the farm working in the traditional ways for many more years to come.  All donations made at the museum this year will also be going towards the upkeep of our four magnificent horses.”

Simon Trueman, wagoner and equine manager at Acton Scott Historic Working Farm, said:

“I’m really happy with the generous help we’ve had enabling us to get William and Alfie to the farm, so far they haven’t put a foot wrong and will soon be relieving Charlie of the heavy duties.”

Charlie is still working but has moved to lighter duties that suit him better. Early visitors now have the opportunity to groom Charlie and sit on his back and he’s loving the attention.  Joe (the younger horse) is still rehabilitating well and is also out greeting the public and doing some of the lighter work.

Charlie and Joe are loving life in their phased retirement

Acton Scott Historic Working Farm are holding a series of family and child friendly events, activities and workshops over the Easter holidays including the chance to get close to Charlie and Joe.

For more information about what’s on at the Farm, click here.

 

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Categories: Shropshire

Shrewsbury’s Pride Hill improvement work nears completion

Shropshire Council News Feed - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 16:30

Pride Hill in Shrewsbury

Work to upgrade and enhance Shrewsbury’s Pride Hill as part of the Shrewsbury Integrated Transport Package is due to be completed soon.

Steve Davenport, Cabinet member for highways and parking, said:

“Shropshire Council is extremely pleased to see the rapid pace and quality of work now being undertaken by McPhillips Ltd to bring the Pride Hill improvement works to a conclusion.

“It’s anticipated that the bottom section will be completed by mid-May, with works continuing afterwards on the top section, including the completion of new street furniture, planting, wayfinding signs and new lighting, plus remedial works to paving. In line with the Shrewsbury Integrated Transport Package (SITP) plans, this will deliver a brand new, high-quality urban space to the town’s key shopping area, and this will totally refresh the area as a place to shop, meet, and spend time for residents and visitors alike.

“Shropshire Council is investing £12m overall in the town through the SITP, and this is addressing key issues such as congestion, road safety, pedestrian wayfinding, the visitor experience and public realm enhancements. Building on the town’s annual footfall increase in recent times – which is bucking the national trend – the SITP will add further to the profile of Shrewsbury as a key local and regional destination for shoppers, tourists and businesses.

“We’d like to thank the town’s residents and traders for their ongoing patience as these vital improvement works are carried out.”

More information on the current and future SITP phases is available at www.shropshire.gov.uk/sitp.

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Hospital team aims to reduce Neonatal admissions

Shropshire Council News Feed - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 16:29

News from our partners Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH)

A team at the Trust which runs Shropshire’s two acute hospitals is developing new ways of working to try to reduce the number of full-term babies unexpectedly admitted onto the Neonatal Unit.

As part of a national project called ATAIN (Avoiding Term Admissions Into Neonatal units) the Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH) is using a novel method to keep mums and babies together.

There are four main reasons why babies born at term (after 37 weeks) may be admitted unexpectedly onto a Neonatal Unit. These are: breathing problems, low blood sugar, jaundice and asphyxia.

Elizabeth Pearson, Quality Improvement Lead Midwife at SaTH, said:

“Having a baby transferred to the Neonatal Unit can be incredibly stressful for the parents. Not only do they have the worry about the health of their baby, but they are also separated from them which can naturally leave them feeling anxious.

“As a Trust we are not only looking at ways of reducing admissions onto the Neonatal Unit but also at ways of carrying out some procedures which traditionally would have taken place on the Unit at the bedside on the Postnatal Ward instead, so that mum and baby can stay together.”

Skin-to-skin contact is encouraged after the birth of the baby, which brings benefits including regulating the baby’s heartbeat, temperature and breathing and encouraging feeding.

To reduce instances of respiratory problems there has been a drive to identify babies who may be at risk, for example babies born weighing less than expected. Those babies that are identified are given a knitted red hat to wear, which identifies them as requiring regular observations and maintains their temperature by keeping their heads warm.

Midwives Claire Beaman and Heather Cox with some of the red hats

Elizabeth said:

“Thanks to collaborative working with the Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin Maternity Voice Partnership we have an incredible supply of knitted hats for the wards.”

To reduce admissions for hypoglycaemia, new procedures have been put in place allowing Midwives to administer oral glucose gel to newborn babies with low blood sugars, which prevents the problem from deteriorating, avoiding the need for admission to the Neonatal Unit.

To reduce the risk of babies developing low blood sugar, different medication is now given if a woman develops high blood pressure in labour and needs a one-off dose of medication to correct this, as certain types of medication are known to increase the risk of low blood sugar in newborn babies.

Elizabeth added:

“To reduce the risk of further separation from their mothers, babies that require cannulation (where a small plastic tube is inserted to allow medication to be given) are now treated, with consent, at the mother’s bedside rather than being transferred to the Neonatal Unit for the cannula to be inserted.”

Overseeing this work, regular meetings are held between clinicians from a range of specialities including the lead Obstetric and Neonatal Consultants, the Maternity Matron, Delivery Suite Managers, Neonatal Unit Manager, Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Postnatal Ward Manager, Neonatal Unit Sister, Delivery Suite Co-ordinator, Education Midwife and Quality Improvement Lead Midwife.

The team has also linked with other Neonatal Units both inside and outside of the region to give assurances on the work taking place. E-learning has begun for all maternity and neonatal nursing and medical staff, and staff training at medical induction and midwifery training updates on neonatal resuscitation both include ATAIN information.

Elizabeth said:

“Babies are reviewed by senior staff before being transferred to the Neonatal Unit and separated from their mothers.

“We are aiming to keep our term admission rate below 5% of our monthly births. In January last year our rate was 5.9% but in January this year that had fallen to 3.8% – a good reflection of the success of the work being done.”

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Give Easter eggs a break

Shropshire Council News Feed - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 16:16

News from our partners NHS Shropshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)

Give chocolate Easter eggs a break this Easter says NHS Shropshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), as it gives tips on how to avoid a sugar rush.

A small Easter egg, of between 65 to 80 grams, can contain around 40g of sugar which is equivalent to eight teaspoons of sugar. These small eggs are usually aimed at young children, whilst a large egg, weighing around 260 to 300grams, can have around 30 teaspoons of sugar.

Wendy Ballard, Dietician at the CCG, said:

“It’s surprising how much sugar is in an Easter egg, and when you consider that on average a child can receive around eight chocolate eggs of various sizes, then it is worth considering the amount of sugar they could consume over the Easter break.

“We’ve got some ideas to avoid a chocolate overload this Easter such as limiting the amount of chocolate children eat so it is spread out over the week, buying the smaller eggs or spending egg money on a small gift such as a book or magazine or some Easter craft materials, or giving children money instead to encourage saving.”

To help keep track of how much sugar is in your food when you are out shopping  download the Change4Life Free Food Scanner app at the AppStore or Google Play or check out more food details at https://www.nhs.uk/change4life/food-facts

Wendy said:

“The app is a brilliant tool to use when out and about food shopping and I would urge parents to download it, because the kids can get involved too and have lots of fun choosing products as well as learning more about the snacks that they eat. It is also a great tool for anyone looking at watching their weight as you can check the calories in your food as you put them in your shopping basket.”

The CCG is also encouraging people to make sure that any urgently needed prescriptions are up-to-date before the Easter break.

GP practices across the county will be closed on both Bank Holidays, Good Friday (19 April 2019) and Easter Monday (22 April 2019). There will be appointments under the extended hours service for pre-bookable routine GP appointments. These are booked at a patient’s local practice and the appointment will be offered at a local GP hub so patients may not see their own GP.

Pharmacies across Shropshire are also operating on a rota over the Easter Bank Holiday Weekend.

Full details of the pharmacy rota are available on the CCG’s web site www.shropshireccg.nhs.uk or by calling NHS 111.

NHS 111 is free to call from any landline or mobile and is open 24/7, including bank holidays. Trained advisers can help advise and direct you to the help and care you need including what to do if you need to see a doctor when your practice is closed as well as where your nearest pharmacy is.

Dr Julian Povey, Chair of Shropshire CCG, said:

“There is no need to worry if your practice is closed this Easter Bank Holiday weekend as help and advice is at your fingertips – just call 111.

“NHS 111 can give you help and advice as well as direct you to services if you can’t wait until your practice is open.”

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Categories: Shropshire

Decisions made by South planning committee on 9 April 2019

Shropshire Council News Feed - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 13:45

The following decisions were made by Shropshire Council’s South planning committee at its meeting at Shirehall, Shrewsbury on Tuesday 9 April 2019.

Buildings to the north of Small Heath Farmhouse, Ashford Bank, Claverley (16/03673/COU) Change of use of redundant agricultural buildings Units 2 & 3 to B1 (light industrial) and Units 4, 5 & 6 to B8 (storage and warehousing).

Decision

That, as per the officer’s recommendation, planning permission be granted subject to the conditions as set out in Appendix 1 to the report, subject to Condition No. 7 being amended to read as follows:

  • The use hereby permitted shall be carried out on Monday – Fridays between 08.00 and 18.30 and Saturdays 09.00 and 13.00, and at no time on Sundays, Bank or Public Holidays.

Proposed exception site dwelling north east of The Barn, Underton, Bridgnorth (18/00945/FUL) Erection of one affordable dwelling with detached 2-bay garage block.

Decision

That, as per the officer’s recommendation, planning permission be granted, subject to:

  • The conditions as set out in Appendix 1 to the report;
  • There being no material objections raised by the Shropshire Council’s Tree Officer and Drainage Officer; and
  • A Section 106 Legal Agreement to ensure the dwelling remains an affordable dwelling in perpetuity.

13 Love Lane, Bridgnorth, WV16 4HE (18/01233/FUL) Erection of part two storey part single storey extension to form self-contained ancillary residential accommodation (Amended Plans Received).

Decision

That, as per the officer’s recommendation, planning permission be granted subject to:

  • The conditions as set out in Appendix 1 to the report; and
  • In order to protect the amenity of occupiers of nearby and neighbouring properties from potential nuisance, an additional condition to control hours of work/construction.

Proposed development land east of Meadowbrook Close, Alveley (18/03172/FUL) Erection of 6 affordable dwellings and associated works.

Decision

That this application be deferred to enable the applicant to give further consideration to the design of the dwellings and landscaping of the site.

47 Folley Road, Ackleton, WV6 7JL (18/05705/FUL) Erection of single storey rear extension with roof terrace above.

Decision

That, contrary to the officer’s recommendation, planning permission be refused for the following reasons:

  • Given the difference in levels, orientation and proximity the proposed development would be overbearing and would adversely affect the privacy of the occupants of neighbouring properties.  The proposal is therefore contrary to Shropshire Core Strategy policies CS6 and Site Allocation and Management of Development (SAMDev) Plan policy MD2.

 

For further information relating to the decisions go to our online planning register and search for the application by using the reference number or keyword.

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Categories: Shropshire

Leading motor company secures grant to return to Shropshire

Shropshire Council News Feed - Mon, 04/15/2019 - 09:34

Market Drayton Business Grant Scheme has enabled a company to move back into Shropshire, bringing jobs and investment into the county.

The scheme, which is funded by Shropshire Council and administered by the Marches Growth Hub, was launched in 2017 to support the growth of new and existing businesses in Market Drayton and those wishing to move to the area.

A 50 per cent grant towards the £137,000 transformation of a business unit at Tern Valley Business Park has enabled Valley Motorsport to locate their entire business in Shropshire, after previously having to base a part of the business in Wrexham, Clwyd.

Daniel Morris, Valley Motorsport, and Lisa Ashby, Shropshire Council’s economic growth team.

Dan Morris, Valley Motorsport’s Director, said:

“We started the company in Shropshire nine years ago. All of our employees live locally in Shropshire, but we expanded so quickly, we had to move into Wales to find the additional space we needed. This meant that our employees had to commute, and our business was split over two sites.  However, we are now delighted to be able to bring the entire business back home”.

Valley Motorsport, Market Drayton

Valley Motorsport is a family-run business. The company restore and prepare historic racing cars, specialising in Jaguars, and have clients all over the world.

Valley Motorsport, Market Drayton

Dan added:

“The grant has been a huge help. We could not have developed the building to the specification we needed without it. We have a number of high value customers who take cars to high-profile races in Europe and the UK each year. It’s our job to get the cars race-ready and ship them to wherever they are needed. We now have a purpose-built modern workshop and can entertain these clients in first-class premises, and in our home county of Shropshire.

“The tremendous support we received from Marches Growth Hub Shropshire and Shropshire Council has also made the application process a smooth one.”

Valley Motorsport, Market Drayton

Market Drayton Business Grant Scheme supports both the start-up of new businesses and the growth of existing businesses within Market Drayton. It also supports those looking to relocate or expand their business into the town and surrounding area.

Steve Charmley, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for assets, economic growth and regeneration, said:

“We are really pleased we have been able to assist Valley Motorsport in securing this grant. It has helped the company to streamline their business and create efficiencies, as well as create and safeguard jobs.

“The grant scheme was launched to encourage economic development and to support the growth and expansion plans of businesses in the town through capital investment. Enabling businesses to grow and succeed is one of our key economic growth priorities and the grant scheme is helping us to drive forward investment in Market Drayton and create jobs’’.

Grant money is still available for eligible businesses and anyone interested in finding out more should email the Marches Growth Hub Shropshire at marchesgrowthhub@shropshire.gov.uk

Further information

Market Drayton Business Grant Scheme

Market Drayton Business Grant Scheme supports the start-up of new businesses and the growth of existing Small/Medium Enterprises (SMEs*) within Market Drayton and those also looking to relocate or expand their business into Market Drayton.

It is funded by Shropshire Council and is being delivered by the one-stop-shop for business support in the region, the Marches Growth Hub.

*SME Definition – businesses employing fewer than 250 full time equivalent persons and having an annual turnover not exceeding 50 million euro and/or have an annual balance sheet total not exceeding 43 million euro.

How much funding is available?

Businesses can apply for discretionary grant support up to a maximum of 50 per cent of the total project cost and subject to state aid limits. Match funding will have to be from private sources and will need to be evidenced at application stage.

The scheme will complement grant schemes currently available through EU funding, including programmes such as the Business Growth Programme and Marches Building Investment Grant.

Criteria

This grant will support commercial businesses delivering projects which will:

  • Create new jobs and contribute to the creation of new employment opportunities.
  • Contribute to the creation of new businesses.
  • Increase productivity and turnover.
  • Enable inward investment.
  • Encourage innovation, diversification and business growth.

Current European Regional Development Funding (ERDF) is restricted to enterprises engaged in business to business trading, whereas this scheme is open to all apart from agricultural and retail businesses (shops, cafes, takeaways etc). Please check with the Project Officer if your business falls within the planning use classification of Class A1-A5.

Businesses can apply for the grant at any point, though it is a competitive grant scheme and applicants are encouraged to submit an application as soon as possible.

 

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Categories: Shropshire

Town Walls in Shrewsbury to close for resurfacing work

Shropshire Council News Feed - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 12:12

Resurfacing is set to be carried out shortly as part of improvement works between Town Walls and Claremont Bank in Shrewsbury.

The work is being carried out as part of the Shrewsbury Integrated Transport Package (SITP) – a package of  measures designed to improve the transport system in Shrewsbury by improving key junctions and enhancing the town centre.

One of the final stages of the Town Walls to Claremont Bank work is the resurfacing of the road. This work will take place between 22 April and 5 May [2019] and will require the roads to be fully closed to traffic so that work can be carried out safely.

Town Walls in Shrewsbury

As with previous closures, the road will be closed from Beeches Lane (Town Walls) at its junction with Williams Way, with diversions routes in place. Traffic Management operatives will be stationed at each closure point to allow access for residents and businesses only.

In addition, from the week commencing 15 April there will be some short-term closures to allow new streetlighting and kerbing to be installed within narrow areas on Claremont Bank. These clsoures are only expected to last daytime working hours.

Once the resurfacing work is complete, the final paving will be completed on the new footpaths, with works anticipated to be fully complete by mid-May [2019].

Work being carried out as part of the Town Walls to Claremont Bank improvements includes: the upgrading of footway materials to improve the aesthetic appearance of the area; improvements to footway crossing facilities along the whole route; improved road layout and parking, and the carriageway resurfacing.

For more information about the Shrewsbury Integrated Transport Package, go to www.shropshire.gov.uk/sitp.

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Categories: Shropshire

New free soft play area opens in Shrewsbury’s Darwin Shopping Centre

Shropshire Council News Feed - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 09:20

A new soft play area for children aged eight and under is now open in Shrewsbury’s Darwin Shopping Centre.

Darwin’s Den is free to use and is run by Shrewsbury Shopping Centres in association with Little Rascals and Shrewsbury Town in the Community. The wall art was designed by local author and illustrator Emma Lawrence.

Alongside the soft play equipment, there are table and chairs to give parents and carers somewhere to sit and rest while their children play – as well as tables and chairs for little ones. People are invited to bring their own food and drink.

Darwin’s Den will be open Monday to Saturday from 9am to 5pm, and on Sundays from 10.30am to 4.30pm.

Kevin Lockwood, Shrewsbury Shopping Centres manager, said:

“We’re thrilled that Darwin’s Den is now open and look forward to welcoming children and their families in the days and weeks ahead. As well as offering children somewhere to play, Darwin’s Den offers grown-ups the chance to have a well-deserved rest when they’re out shopping with their youngsters. All we ask is that children are supervised while using the play equipment.”

Ben Wootton, director of Little Rascals, said:

“I am really pleased that Little Rascals can be a part of this great new facility for local families. At Little Rascals we strive to offer as much as possible for children in Shropshire and being involved in this was a great way to do more of that. We look forward to seeing the enjoyment this soft play area will give to children and parents visiting the Darwin Centre”

Emma Lawrence said:

“I loved designing the wall art for the unit. Children can have their photo taken with Lenny the Lion, spot all the butterflies and bugs or measure themselves on the height chart!”

Located on the middle level of the centre next to Marks & Spencer, Darwin’s Den was officially opened yesterday (Thursday 11 April 2019) by Shrewsbury Mayor Councillor Peter Nutting. The Little Rascals Foundation is this year’s Mayor’s Charity.

Shrewsbury Mayor Peter Nutting officially opens Darwin’s Den, with (l-r) Dave Edwards from Little Rascals; Ceri Nicholls from Shrewsbury Town in the Community; and Kevin Lockwood from Shrewsbury shopping centres.

The play structure was designed and assembled by Steve Plimmer from PlayFrames UK.

For more information about Shrewsbury shopping centres, visit www.shrewsbury-shopping.co.uk.

Further information

For information about LIttle Rascals, go to: www.uklittlerascals.com

For informatiuon about Shrewsbury Town in the Community, go to: www.shrewsburytowninthecommunity.com

For information about Emma Lawrence, go to: www.emmalawrence.com

Some of Emma Lawrence’s wall art inside Darwin’s Den

Issued on behalf of Shrewsbury Shopping Centres

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Categories: Shropshire

Family fun this Easter with Shropshire Museums

Shropshire Council News Feed - Fri, 04/12/2019 - 08:00

Join Shropshire Museums this Easter holiday for a whole host of family and child friendly events, arts and crafts sessions and trails.

Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery, Shrewsbury Castle and Acton Scott Historic Working Farm are running events perfect for the whole family from Sunday 14 – Wednesday 24 April including some special Easter themed fun.

Lezley Picton, Shropshire Council Cabinet member for culture and leisure, said:

“These Easter events at Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery, Shrewsbury Castle and Acton Scott Historic Working Farm are a wonderful and fun way for families and children to engage with and experience different elements of Shropshire’s rich culture and heritage.

 

“If you’re looking for something to do over Easter, I would strongly recommend visiting at least one of these stunning Shropshire attractions.”

Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery

Join Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery for Bear themed sessions and events and visit the current special exhibition, Bears!

Reading in the bear cave in the Bears exhibition at Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery

Paddington 2 will be screened on Wednesday 17 April on the balcony in the Museum.

Join storyteller Sally Tonge for Bear, Sing and Share on Tuesday 16 and 23 April at 11am for some Easter holiday magic.

Storyteller, Sally Tonge will be hosting Bear, Sing & Shine over the Easter holidays

For more information about Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery, click here and you can see the full list of events here.

Shrewsbury Castle

Shrewsbury Castle will be open throughout the Easter holidays including Good Friday, Easter Sunday and Bank Holiday Monday.

Grade I listed Shrewsbury Castle

During Easter, children will be able to take part in the hugely popular teddy bear hunt encouraging them to delve into the collections and note where they find the bears and what is around them.

Usually opened only once a year, Laura’s Tower will be open on Easter Sunday giving visitors a rare opportunity to enter and explore, free of charge.

Laura’s Tower at Shrewsbury Castle (©Chris Glover)

For more information about Shrewsbury Castle, click here.

Acton Scott Historic Working Farm

Acton Scott Historic Working Farm will be running family and child friendly Easter demonstrations throughout the school holidays.

Join the team for grooming the shire horses, chick holding, bottle feeding the lambs and a guided tour of the Victorian farm yard every day during the holidays.

Bottle feed lambs at Acton Scott Historic Working Farm this Easter holidays

Easter events at Acton Scott Historic Working Farm will be running from Sunday 14 to Wednesday 24 April. For more information about the events, click here.

All three of these attractions are open during the Easter bank holiday weekend.

Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery, Shrewsbury Castle and Acton Scott Historic Working Farm are owned and operated by Shropshire Council.

 

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Categories: Shropshire

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